Musings of a roaming nature nerd

Revisiting Bird Banding

In 2011 I posted about the process of banding birds.  I have decided to post again because it’s a fascinating and exciting process to handle birds and learn about their physiology, behavior and migration through true hands on experiences.

A few photos below show some of the birds in hand we banded this season and the two videos found provide a closer look at the process itself. This Spotted Towhee Banding video was taken at one of our MAPs (Monitoring Avian Productivity and Survivorship) banding stations. I do not manage to explain things very well because I was kind of distracted and questioning myself too much, but at least it’s a representation of what we’re doing!

 

With an Anna's Hummingbird

With an Anna’s Hummingbird

 

Wrentit with the mist net behind.

Wrentit with the mist net behind.

 

Yellow Warbler

Yellow Warbler

 

Baby and Papa Nuttal's Woodpeckers

Baby and Papa Nuttall’s Woodpeckers

 

Hooded Oriole

Hooded Oriole

 

Bullock's Oriole

Bullock’s Oriole

 

Rufous-crowned Sparrow (and Brandon)

Rufous-crowned Sparrow (and Brandon)

 

Warbling Vireo

Warbling Vireo

 

Western Scrub Jay

Western Scrub Jay

 

Ash-throated Flycatcher

Ash-throated Flycatcher

 

Color bands on a Least Bell's Vireo

Color bands on a Least Bell’s Vireo

 

Least Bell's Vireo showing active molt in its flight feathers

Least Bell’s Vireo showing active molt in its flight feathers

 

This Nestling Banding video shows Jason handling a 6 day old, Least Bell’s Vireo chick that he’s just removed from the nest in order to put a colored and numbered band on its leg. He’s trying to work quickly so that the parents are not too upset by the absence of their baby. He places the band on the bird, weighs it and will then (after banding its siblings) take it back to the nest right away.

 

Jason with a teeny tiny nestling!

Jason with a teeny tiny nestling!

 

 

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Banded siblings (Anne, David and Brian?!)

Banded siblings (Anne, David and Brian?!)

One Response

  1. Dad

    Wow, that baby banding was amazing. So tiny and delicate. Takes a deft touch.

    July 6, 2014 at 7:01 am